One of my favourite issues to jot down about is tea historical past. I like immersing myself in the traditions and and culture of tea, particularly teaware. I get utterly swept up in imagining what consuming tea was like throughout numerous time intervals. Recently, buddy and fellow blogger Lynn Karegeannes reached out to see if I might write just a few panels for a tea exhibit she’s serving to to curate on the Smith-McDowell House Museum, a historic home in Asheville, North Carolina. The exhibit is titled Infused In History: A Tea Exhibit.

The Exhibit
Infused In History opens April 24th and runs by September. From the Smith-McDowell House website:

Beginning April 24, come to the Smith-McDowell House and add TEA to your TOUR! Each of our exhibit rooms will function tea-related gadgets and academic panels in regards to the historical past, use and follow of taking tea. We have searched our assortment and can have some ‘new’ treasures to show in addition to some ‘on loan’ gadgets of curiosity.

Lynn requested if I’d contribute two panels for the exhibit, and I made a decision to jot down one on the historical past of European porcelain and the Meissen manufacturing unit, and one other on the event of handles on tea cups. Bruce Richardson of Elmwood Inn Fine Teas is the historic advisor for the exhibit, and it was so thrilling to have him learn my panels.

 

European Porcelain History

I’ve posted in regards to the history of teacup handles earlier than, so I assumed I’d write a little bit bit about what I discovered about European porcelain, maybe to spark your curiosity in the exhibit.
I assumed the origin of the phrase ‘porcelain’ itself was fairly fascinating. The phrase was first utilized by explorer Marco Polo, who encountered the fabric whereas touring by China. The delicate, materials reminded Polo of a seashell, and so he described it utilizing the Portuguese time period porcellana, a sort of cowrie shell.
As I’ve talked about in previous posts, Europe was loopy for the porcelain teaware exported from China beginning in the 1700s, and plenty of artisans and entrepreneurs have been desperately making an attempt to recreate the fabric with out a lot success. But with the quantity of teaware Europeans required, it was essential to discover a manner of producing it nearer to dwelling.
So, when did Europe lastly uncover the ‘white gold’? German alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger is credited as discovering a components
for hard-paste porcelain in 1708.
ttger was initially
making an attempt to create gold (he was an alchemist, in any case) when he attracted the eye of Augustus the Strong,
the gold-hungry Elector of Saxony and ruler of Poland. Augustus ended up imprisoning Böttger in the hopes of forcing him
to create gold, however by his experiments Böttger
ended up making porcelain as a substitute. It’s troublesome to pinpoint which producer began creating porcelain
first, however in 1710 Böttger’s
discovery led Augustus The Strong to ascertain the Meissen manufacturing unit in Germany, which turned the primary to fabricate porcelain in giant portions and unmatched
high quality.

 

Learn More 
If you are as loopy for teaware historical past as I’m, I hope you possibly can try the exhibit! Please do report again in case you get there, and let me know what you suppose. Be positive to take a look at Lynn’s blog to be taught much more about this exhibit. Also take a look on the calendar of events for the exhibit, as there are some fascinating issues taking place, together with a lecture by Bruce Richardson. If I lived nearer, I’d be in the entrance row!

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Load More By John Richard
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