Bai Hao Yin Zhen
Silver Needle
白毫银针

A favourite of the “Tea Emperor,” this historical, top-quality white tea is as lovely because it is scrumptious.

Also often known as: Baihao Yinzhen, White Hair Silver Needle, White Pekoe Silver Needle

Origin: Northern area of Fujian province in southeast China

Type: Chinese white tea

Appearance: Buds are massive, fats, and lined in pale silvery-white fuzz or “down” that resembles tiny hairs; the brewed tea ranges from ivory to a pale honey yellow.

Taste: Smooth, gentle, recent, and barely candy, with out a lot astringency. Sometimes has a juicy and even citrus undertone paying homage to tangerine or mandarin orange.

Aroma: Light, candy, and floral, like recent wildflowers with a touch of honey.

Varieties: The predominant sorts of Silver Needle are named for his or her counties of origin: Zheng He and Fuding. Fuding is the older of the 2 varieties, identified to be cultivated because the 1790s; Zheng He manufacturing started round 1880. Both sorts are produced in related methods: The recent younger buds, lined in white down, are plucked by hand on just a few sunny days of the yr, normally in March or April. The buds are then laid in bamboo baskets to wilt and dry. Silver Needle tea is solely barely oxidized and never fired or fermented, leading to its gentle shade and delicate qualities. Fuding Silver Needle tends to be lighter in shade and physique, whereas Zheng He spends extra time withering, leading to a darker, extra oxidized tea. Occasionally, Silver Needle is wilted together with jasmine blossoms, making a scented Jasmine Silver Needle selection.

Steeping Tips: The white leaves will immediately flip inexperienced when infused. White teas could be steeped a number of occasions; 4 to 6 infusions are normally attainable.

Typical Preparation: Start by steeping 2-Three teaspoons (about 3-Four grams) per eight ounces of scorching water (roughly 175-180 levels Fahrenheit) for as much as 6 minutes. Don’t use boiling water; the ensuing tea can be very yellow and bitter, with none of the fragile taste of a correctly ready white tea. For later steepings, use the identical temperature water, however enhance the time based mostly in your private taste.

Floating Preparation: For an infusion that’s as lovely because it is tasty, float free Silver Needle in scorching water, both in a glass teapot or just a glass cup—in China, Silver Needle is typically ready in a tall ingesting glass to indicate off the leaves. The leaves will gently sink to the underside as they infuse, creating a sublime and scrumptious expertise.

Teaware: Glass teaware finest highlights the great thing about Silver Needle tea. However, a conventional gongfu set is additionally acceptable; attempt utilizing a Yixing or porcelain teapot or gaiwan.

Trivia: It’s mentioned that the Chinese Emperor Hui Tsung was so obsessive about discovering and making ready the right Silver Needle tea that he was too preoccupied to maintain his empire from being invaded by the Mongols.

What’s All the Fuzz? Silver Needle tea is identified for the downy white fuzz throughout its massive buds. But what’s up with that?

It’s not simply white tea: All tea naturally has that fuzzy protecting in some unspecified time in the future within the rising course of. Those little hairs are known as trichomes, and so they assist shield and nurture new leaves on the tea plant. That’s why they present up in your packet of Silver Needle tea; Silver Needle is produced solely from the youngest, freshest buds of the Camellia sinensis, delicately harvested by hand and dried with a minimal of fuss and tinkering. That implies that the hairs haven’t naturally diminished, as they do on older tea leaves, and so they haven’t been rubbed off or eliminated by a harsh manufacturing course of.

So embrace that fuzzy cup of tea! All these little hairs show that your Silver Needle was plucked on the peak of freshness, prepared to offer you a singular tea expertise.

Try:

This publish was beforehand revealed in 2013


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